Scripts...

Here’s the way scripts are posted:

The Writer submits script to a Production Company. The writer has written the descriptions of roles (age, race, sex and any other requirements).

The Production Company or Director submits the Roles to the Casting Directors.

The Casting Director submits the Role based on the age, race, sex and any other requirements to a Breakdown service or directly to an person (A big Star).

eService’s pull these breakdowns and scripts and send them out to the Actor that fit the age.

So if there is a project in your age you will receive it as soon as it is posted.

We do not have any control over the process or when projects roles are posted, what age, race, sex and any other requirements of the role

Steven Scott

You never can train enough! A talent should always be working on their craft. The Scripts you receive are great for practicing. You need to connect with the camera and your audience. Work on dictation and making your acting look natural. 

Good Luck Steven

Hollywood Height &The Wannabes on Starz

https://www.imdb.com/name/nm2005838/

Commercials…..

Here’s the way commercials are posted:

Production Company. The writer has written the descriptions of roles (age, race, sex and any other requirements). The Production Company give the Casting Director 2-4 days to cast most commercials.

The Production Company submits the Roles to the Casting Directors. The Casting Director submits the Role based on the age, race, sex and any other requirements to a Breakdown service or directly to an person (A big Star). Because of the short dates most casting director will pull from local talent only.

So if you are in the location the commercial is being shoot you would have a better chance to at a role in a commercial. Because of the short production schedules we do not have time to pull the script send it to our talent before the shoot date.

Davis Cleveland

Disney’s Shake It Up Uphttps://www.imdb.com/name/nm3121911/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Davis_Cleveland

a big thanks to Crawford Talent Management for getting me started and helping me even after I got an Agent. 

Thanks David &Maui

Roles…

Here’s the way roles are posted: 

Lead: this is the person or persons that carry the show. Usually star name talent are offered these roles first. If the production company or the director cannot find what they are looking for in the role they will submit to everyone.

Supporting: this is the secondary roles just below the lead, these range from minor roles to principal players and are often pivotal or vital to the story as in a best friend, love interest, sidekick. A speaking role that is less than that of a lead actor, but larger than a bit part.

Recurring: characters usually start out as guest stars in one episode but continue to show up in future episodes if the story-lines or actors are compelling enough. Sometimes a recurring character eventually becomes part of the main cast of characters; such a character is sometimes called a breakout character.

Guest Star: when the performer does not belong to the regular cast, such an outside performer is often referred to as a guest star, the role usually are only in one episode but multiple scenes.

Co-Star: A supporting role who usually has less dialogue than a guest star.

Cameo: Usually a smaller role in a film played by a well-known celebrity, and does get on-screen credit.

Featured Extra: An actor who does not have lines but is given special focus; screen credit is rare.

Day player: is used to refer to most performers with supporting speaking roles hired on a daily basis with or without dialog.

Extras or Background Players: no dialogue and are there to fill in the background, i.e. patrons in a restaurant, fans at a ballgame, workers in an office, etc.

Stunt Person – A specially trained performer who performs stunts on camera.

Most Co-star, featured extra, day player, extras or background players are hired locally. This means you must be physically at the location where the filming is taking place. You must work as a local hire, this means you are responsible for all expenses. There are not any funds for any of your travel expense for this project. Production will not cover any expenses for any talent.

Unions and Organizations

AEA or Actors’ Equity Association is the labor union that represents American actors and stage managers in theatre.

SAG-AFTRA or the Screen Actors Guild – American Federation of Television and Radio Artists is the labor union that represents film and television actors, broadcast journalists, radio personalities, recording artists, singers, voice actors, and other media professionals.

AVGA or the American Guild of Variety Artists is an AFL-CIO affiliated labor union that represents performing artists and stage managers for live performances in the variety field. This includes singers & dancers in touring shows, theme park performers, skaters, circus performers, comedians, stand-up comics, and cabaret club artists.

AGMA or the American Guild of Musical Artists is the American labor union that represents opera singers, ballet dancers, opera directors, opera and dance company production personnel, and figure skaters.

TYA or Theatre for Young Audiences is a national service organization which is an advocate to try to strengthen and diversify the field of theatre for young audiences

How Do I Get Into the Screen Actors Guild?

There are three ways to qualify for SAG membership.

1 – Get hired as a principal performer in a SAG signatory show. Performers may join SAG upon proof of employment. Employment must be in a principal or speaking role in a SAG film, videotape, television program or commercial. Proof of such employment may be in the form of a signed contract, or original pay stubs. (least likely way in).
2 – Performers may join SAG if the applicant is a paid-up member of an affiliated performers union (AFTRA, AEA, AGVA, AGMA or ACTRA) for a period of at least one year AND has worked at least once as a principal performer in that union’s jurisdiction. (If you are a member of one of these unions then you are probably not reading this).
3 – To get hired as a SAG extra for three days. (this is the most likely way to get in)